Philip-Lorca Di Corcia

Selected Biography

Philip-Lorca diCorcia (b. 1951, Hartford, Conn.) studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and received his MFA in Photography from Yale University in 1979.

DiCorcia is often acknowledged as one of the most influential photographers of his generation, and his work is frequently shown alongside that of his peers in exhibitions addressing our cultural zeitgeist. At the beginning of his career in the late 1970s, diCorcia situated his friends and family within fictional interior tableaus. He later shifted his attention outward, photographing strangers in urban spaces—Berlin, Calcutta, Hollywood, New York, Rome, Tokyo—and infused the pictures with supplementary lighting to achieve a sense of heightened drama. Each of his series, “Hustlers,” “Streetwork,” “Heads,” “A Storybook Life,” and “Lucky Thirteen,” can be considered progressive explorations of diCorcia’s formal and conceptual fields of interest.

DiCorcia received his first solo show in 1985 and has been featured in one-person exhibitions worldwide, including those at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Centre National de la Photographie, Paris; the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London; the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; Art Space Ginza, Toyko; and the Sprengel Museum, Hannover. Exhibited in group shows throughout the United States and Europe since 1977, diCorcia's work was included in the traveling exhibition “Pleasures and Terrors of Domestic Comfort,” organized by the Museum of Modern Art, New York (1991), prior to being given a solo show there (“Philip-Lorca diCorcia: Strangers,” 1993). His work was featured in the 1997 Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and in “Cruel and Tender” at the Tate Modern, London (2003), and has also been exhibited in Essen, Salamanca, and Stockholm. DiCorcia’s work was included in “Fashioning Fiction in Photography Since 1990” (2004) at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. His most recent series was seen in the Carnegie Museum of Art’s 54th Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh.

DiCorcia has received numerous awards and honors throughout his career, including grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. In 2001, diCorcia won the Infinity Award for Applied Photography from the International Center of Photography in New York.

DiCorcia’s work can be found in myriad public and private art collections both here and abroad, such as the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Museo Nacional Centro de Art Reina Sofía, Madrid; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New Yand the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

Education

Yale University, New Haven, M.F.A. 1979
School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts Post Graduate Certificate, 1976
School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts Diploma, 1975

2001...Infinity Award for Applied Photography, International Center of Photography
1998 ...Alfred Eisenstaedt Award, Life Magazine, Style Essay
1989...Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1987...John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship
1986...Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts
1980...Artist Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts